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by Mike Zazaian October 2, 2006 - 12:46pm, 44 Comments

A bundle of fiber optic wires

The Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation has set a new data transfer record using fiber optics, topping out the old record by 4 Terabytes per second.

The speed was achieved over a 100-mile-long fiber optic cable, improving upon the previous 10 terabyte per second record by almost half. At 14 terabytes per second the transfer rate would be the equivalent of downloading approximately 3000 DVD-quality movies in a single second.

Most of the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation’s (NTT) network is currently using fiber optic lines, but speeds across the network currently top out at 1 terabyte per second, with users achieving downloads of 1Gbps. And while internet users across South Korea and Japan already enjoy the high speed transfer rates that fiber optics offer, networks across the US predominantly use co-axial cable. Speeds offered by co-axial connections are significantly lower, however, with the fastest consumer broadband nework, Verizon’s FiOS, topping out at 50Mbps down and 5Mbps up. But even with Verizon achieving such speeds, most networks, such as those of Comcast and AT&T, currently allow users only 5Mpbs down and 500Kbps up.

[via ars technica]